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The Right Way to Manage People

Posted On - 22/08/2014 09:19:59

You can't be a little bit ethical – you either are or you aren't. And if you're to claim it even to yourself, let alone your customers and staff, it can't be done hit-and-missIn the last blog we set out some key ‘tests' for whether something is ethical

  1. Is it good for the long-term success of the business?
  2. Does it conflict with your personal beliefs?
  3. Is beneficial for stakeholders?

Sounds simple enough??

Question is, if we're all to be truly ethical is it enough just to know these things? Can we rely on "knowing" to steer us through the day-to-day? Or is more needed, so we're reminded on what we committed to?

You can't be a little bit ethical – you either are or you aren't. And if you're to claim it even to yourself, let alone your customers and staff, it can't be done hit-and-miss. That's what this blog is all about.

The way we do things around here

Culture isn't one thing – it's more a summary of many that come together as the accepted way people work and do their stuffCulture is a word often used to characterise a business. "Ours is a culture where the customer always comes first" might be an example.

So the word culture gets used as a snapshot how a business works and behaves.

But culture isn't one thingit's more a summary of many that come together as the accepted way people work and do their stuff. It includes the sense of identity for the business – why people would want to buy from you – because that defines the products, services and style of service you'll offer. "We support your products across their full life-cycle" might be another example. You try it: "ours is a culture where…"

Now this blog isn't about how to capture what your culture is or what's best and why. But it is about this: if you want your business to be consistently ethical in everything it does it's your culture – the accepted ways of behaving - that'll help you do it.

Don't tell him Pike!

In a small business the dominant influence on culture is management styleLast week's blog touched on different management styles: David Brent's ‘matey' style versus Captain Mainwaring's distant. And while the difference between ‘management' and ‘leadership' can be debated – is one more about organisation and administration and the other strategy and planning (?) – one thing is true.

In a small business the dominant influence on culture is management style.

If you're an owner how you run your business will dictate its culture. Clearly if it's just you in the business this shouldn't be a surprise.

But if you have staff, be under no illusion, they're looking to you as the example of ‘all things right'.

You're the owner, probably the founder and certainly their employer. At work, you have huge influence over them. And everything you say and do is taken as the example of how to behave.

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